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energy, the same co2 emission. the end of our planet is possible. but there is an enormous chance for us. what they need our products with lower energy consumption. what they need our energy efficient products. who could better develop this than the united states and the europeans, in cooperation together. to combine innovation on climate change with industry and production. that is possible, but only if we are live. therefore i am in favor of a trade agreement. asked what other obstacles there are. a lot of europeans doubting, but i saw better ground here in the united states, in ohio, and i saw for the first time in a swing state, the co2 question played a major role in the election concerning the coal mining question. to avoid any other misunderstanding, i know what it means to close a coal mine for 35,000 inhabitants, most of them employed in the coal mine. when you close down the coal mine, it was an economic disaster. but today, the coal mine is closed down and you have an economically flourishing city. so it is possible to step away from a traditional industrial structure, with pu
in the energy sector a without a carbon tax you are not directly getting back.t >> >> i think you can design one such way that does not cause too much harm for american industries that compete with folks abroad. consumption tax is difficult if you try to do a value added tax. there are things you can do to tweak the income-tax to make it look like a value added tax. >> at the end of the day, what you think the tax code will look like when these conversations between the president and speaker john boehner are done? what will look like when they are done? >> i think we will have slightly higher marginal tax rates on some -- at least one high income tax bracket and i think there will be a variety of tax and exclusions and deductions that are scaled back modestly and that's about it. >> it scaled-back means capt. someone, i agree completely. ." >> i think we will see some of those things rolled back. i think the top rate will be in between 39 and 45%. >> we have some common ground among our economists where we will end up. thank you for joining us and thank you all. i appreciate the pedersen foundat
of over 300 million people, the american society of civil energies put the quality of you are infrastructure as a d, when we're ranked 24th in overall quality in the world when in 2001 we were number two, we're going to spend less than $53 billion. that's not only weak, it's pathetically weak. mr. garamendi: mr. higgins, thank you so very, very much for bringing this issue in stark terms to our attention. you caught me my attention earlier when we were talking about this, but here on the floor, this is a $1,200 billion program that could create 27 million jobs in the next five years? and those are economic analysis that's been done by the new america foundation? mr. higgins: it has. mr. garamendi: and how do we pay for this again? mr. higgins you spay for it as you pay for transportation improvements at the local, state and federal level. you issue debt to finance the life of the project. mr. gare men tee: the same way we build and own our homes, we borrow money to build that personal infrastructure, our home. mr. -- mr. higgins: that's right. mr. garamendi: the borrowing
. then a guest to discuss his "washington monthly" article about the energy bill. live on c-span every day at 7:30 a.m. eastern. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grant at saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? he did. i am not going to say grant was the only person who saved the union. but he was the commanding general of the army that put lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia under robert e. lee that ended the war. if anybody one of the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you cannot, but one of the things we do when history is we generalize, we simplify, because history and reality are simply too complicated to get our heads around if we deal with it in its full complexity. so gramm save the union during the civil war. i do contend that grant saved the union during reconstruction as well. >> from obscurity in illinois to a courthouse in appomattox and 1600 pennsylvania avenue, the light of ulysses s. grant, thursday night. part of b
beyond the obvious of highways and airports, we have to be thinking about our energy infrastructure in this country and whether it serves our economy well. we have already seen thoughtful suggestions on on both sides of the aisle. when it comes to spending and future, we need to be thoughtful about ways to fund infrastructure. many of you saw the article recently in "the washington post." i want to give a belated thanks to the soviets for launching sputnik and schering americans. because of it, there was a program that got me through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our slee
cannot refocus and marshaled the energy and priorities of our country to get ahead, so we brought a speaker who is extraordinarily influential and a true inspiration. there is a quotation that says, when it comes to the future there are three types of people. there are those who let it happen. there are those who make it happen and those who wonder what happens. our speaker tonight makes it happen. he is a businessman. he is an attorney. he is a bit of an entrepreneur. that makes him a remarkable. i think what makes an extraordinary is he is a true leader. he was on the d.c. city council and helped start their voucher program. he wrote a book called voices of determination. it is essentially a testament to how kids can be a testament to adults and overcome great aunts and are true inspiration's region a testament to adults about kids. he advises mayors, congressman all across the country on issues of large. he is in the thick of the game and a complete leader on the issue, and you feel his influence across the country. and we are very fortunate to who areple like thehim savvy plea
to it. i think there was a sense like on energy and environment and education that the president had a vision for where america needs to be in this new century where we've got rising competition in china and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to
? thousands and thousands of workers are building that. or when you redo bls to make them energy efficient, there's endless amount of workers. when angela merkel came over from germany and asked how did you improve your unemployment rate that quickly, she said, "we immediately made a decision to weatherize all the homes in germany." that's energy efficient but also put the employment -- unemployment rate back down to 5%. there is a relationship. >> i think maybe people thought "the inconvenient truth" was like that movie or "avatar." do you think there is a big environmental movie that needs to change people's minds? >> i think incon convenient truth was a terrific movie but it is screaming loud for a sequel. it exposed the problem but that's -- has not ever told us what is the solution. that's the next step i think people are waiting for. avenue abtar or inconvenient truth or many other films, i think they're very good because no matter how you put it, whether you are on the left or the right, as eff said many times, people breathing if you are republican air or democratic air. people jus
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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